< Last Photo   << Last Chapter                Notes on the Geography of Places: Senegal: Barbarie         Next Chapter >>   Next Photo > 
 

Notes on the Geography of Senegal: Barbarie

Time for a walk over to the beach.

Make default image size larger

Senegal: Barbarie picture 1

We're looking across the Petit Bras from the island of Saint-Louis to the spit, the Langue de Barbarie. This "tongue" is mostly deserted but has a dense settlement facing Saint-Louis. The north half of the settlement is N'Dar Toute; the south half is Guet N'Dar.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 2

Hundred of pirogues crowd both the sheltered and surf side of Barbarie. The boats vary from 7 to 24 meters, with crews of from 4 to 15 men. The name? Maybe a sufi leader.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 3

Here's one of which we can be pretty confident: Ibrahima Fall was a disciple of the founder of Senegal's famous Mouride Brotherhood.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 4

There are two bridges across to Barbarie. This is the newer of the two, the Chinese-built Masseck Ndiaye Bridge. It's named for a former mayor of Saint-Louis and opened in 2014. Earlier bridges go back to a footbridge of 1856.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 5

View looking downstream from the lower bridge, a simple concrete post-and-beam structure.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 6

A war memorial sits on the Barbarie side of that lower bridge. The ocean is at the skyline. This road is an exact extension of the Pont Faidherbe to the east and is also the divider between N'Dar Toute and Guet N'Dar.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 7

No plaques or insignia but the same French-and-Senegalese-together imagery of the Demba and Dupont statue in Dakar.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 8

Most of the streets on Barbarie make no effort to hide their underlying sand.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 9

Trudge, trudge. The pirogues have been rolled the 50 meters or so from the water.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 10

Houses crowd right up to the retaining wall.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 11

What is it about the sea that makes people watch? The endless motion?

Senegal: Barbarie picture 12

There's less than a meter of tide.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 13

Small outboards.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 14

Repair shop.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 15

Getting ready to put out to sea.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 16

The technique is about as simple as manhandling and palm logs can make it.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 17

Off they go, now probably with cell phones in case they get into trouble.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 18

Pirogues are still made here.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 19

And decorated.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 20

Planks.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 21

Old dugouts.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 22

Deeper-bellied boats.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 23

It's fishing season, and boats are arriving on the calm inside water of the Petit Bras.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 24

Crowds gather.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 25

Waiting patiently.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 26

Women do some of the buying.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 27

They're a lot better dressed than the men.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 28

Most of the fish are packed in ice trays.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 29

Some go off in horse carts.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 30

Most don't; this is big business.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 31

Some of the traffic heads out internationally in refrigerated trucks.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 32

The trucks are often in their second lives.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 33

Such a come-down! From a Calatrava-designed Spanish opera house to fish.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 34

A mess is left over.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 35

If you just focus on the color, it's almost attractive.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 36

Still farther down spit, things get stark. All kinds of questions arise about now, beginning with "What do the cows and their herders find here?" Is it just bathing in the brine?

Senegal: Barbarie picture 37

They're not talking.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 38

Those buildings, now the site of a quiet dock, were once a seaplane base for Aéropostale, the predecessor of Air France.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 39

That's why there's a monument here to Jean Mermoz, the general inspector of Air France, who was lost at sea in 1936 on a flight heading west from Dakar to Natal, Brazil.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 40

Fishermen die here, too. There's a cemetery just across the road from the fish-loading zone.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 41

It's pretty basic.

Senegal: Barbarie picture 42

In lieu of flowers, neatly raked sand.


www.greatmirror.com Web   
 

* Australia * Austria * Bangladesh * Belgium * Botswana * Brazil * Burma / Myanmar * Cambodia (Angkor) * Canada (B.C.) * China * The Czech Republic * Egypt * Fiji * France * Germany * Ghana * Greece * Hungary * India: Themes * Northern India * Peninsular India * Indonesia * Israel * Italy * Japan * Jerusalem * Jordan * Kenya * Laos * Kosovo * Malawi * Malaysia * Mauritius * Mexico * Morocco * Mozambique * Namibia * The Netherlands * New Zealand * Nigeria * Norway * Oman * Pakistan * The Philippines * Poland * Portugal * Senegal * Singapore * South Africa * Spain * Sri Lanka * Sudan * Syria (Aleppo) * Tanzania * Thailand * Trinidad * Turkey (Istanbul) * Uganda * The U.A.E. (Dubai) * The United Kingdom * The Eastern United States * The Western United States * Oklahoma * Uzbekistan * Vietnam * The West Bank * Yemen * Zambia * Zimbabwe *
go back to previous picture go to next chapter go to next picture go to previous chapter page